Scott H. Stoleson

Research Wildlife Biologist
Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, Yale Univ., 1996.
B.A. Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College 1979.

email: sstoleson@fs.fed.us


Research Interests:

Breeding biology and demography of birds, parrot conservation and management, population modeling, riparian conservation, the biology of invasive exotic species, and mycology.

Current Research:

My current research focuses on the ecology, demography, and habitat use of the southwestern willow flycatcher and other riparian birds. This critically endangered Neotropical migrant is found only dense riparian woodland and thickets locally throughout the Southwest. Since 1997 I have studied the flycatcher population inhabiting the Gila River Valley in southwestern New Mexico, which constitutes the largest population range wide (over 240 breeding pairs out of a total of 450-550 for the entire subspecies). Paradoxically, this population occurs primarily on a working cattle ranch that employs water diversion and irrigated pastures activities considered to be detrimental to the species. The site supports very high densities of a diverse avifauna. The Gila River Valley project is a collaborative effort in conjunction with Western New Mexico University, the Gila National Forest, The Nature Conservancy of New Mexico, the U-Bar Ranch, and Phelps Dodge Corporation. In addition, I have served as part of an inter-agency team to develop a Conservation Assessment for the southwestern willow flycatcher, and as a member of the Implementation Subgroup of the flycatcher Recovery Team.

Additional ongoing projects include an examination of the interaction of fecundity, survival, and population genetics in humpback whales with scientists from the American Museum of Natural History and SUNY Syracuse; and a long-term study of the breeding biology and demography of green-rumped parrotlets in central Venezuela, in collaboration with colleagues from U.C. Berkeley, U. of Miami, and Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela.

 


Selected Publications:

Cartron, J.-L., S.H. Stoleson, P.L.L. Stoleson, and D. Shaw. 2000. Riparian Areas. Pp. 281-327 in Ecological and socioeconomic aspects of livestock management in the Southwest (R. Jemison and C. Raish, eds.). Elseveier Press. In press.

Sandercock, B.K., S.R. Beissinger, S.H. Stoleson, R.R. Melland, and C.R. Hughes. 2000. Survival rates of a Neotropical parrot: implications for latitudinal comparisons of avian demography. Ecology, in press.

Stoleson, S.H.. 2000. [Review of] Avian Conservation: Research and Management. Journal of Wildlife Management 64:314-315.

Stoleson, S.H. and D.M. Finch. 1999. Unusual nest sites for Southwestern Willow Flycatchers. Wilson Bulletin, 111:574-575.

Stoleson, S.H. and S. R. Beissinger. 1999. Egg viability as a constraint on hatching asynchrony in a Neotropical parrot. Journal of Animal Ecology, 68:951-962.

Stoleson, S.H. 1999. The importance of the early onset of incubation for the maintenance of egg viability. Pp. 600-613 In Adams, N. and Slowtow, R. (eds.), Proceedings of the 22nd International Ornithological Congress, Durban, BirdLife South Africa, Johannesburg.

Stoleson, S.H., and S. R. Beissinger. 1997. Extreme hatching asynchrony, brood reduction, and food limitation in a Neotropical parrot: An experimental test. Ecological Monographs 67:131-154.

Stoleson, S.H. 1997. Double jeopardy and the parameterization of brood reduction models: A comment on Mock and Forbes (1994). Auk 114:137-140.

Stoleson, S.H. and S. R. Beissinger. 1997. Hatching asynchrony in parrots: Boon or bane for sustainable use? Pp. 157-180 in Behavioral Approaches to Conservation in the Wild (J.R. Clemmons and R. Buchholz, eds.). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K.

Beissinger, S.R. and S.H. Stoleson. 1997. Hatching asynchrony in birds. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 12:112.

Technical Reports and other Publications

Cartron, J.-L., S. H. Stoleson, S. M. Russell, G.A. Proudfoot, and W.S. Richardson. 2000. The Ferruginous Pygmy-owl in the tropics and at the northern end of its range: habitat relations and requirements. Pp. 47-55 in Ecology and conservation of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-43 (J.-L. Cartron & D.M. Finch, eds.). USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Ogden, UT.

Stoleson, S.H., and D.M. Finch. 1999. Surveys for Southwestern Willow Flycatchers within VR-176. Report to Geo-Marine, Inc. and Holloman Air Force Base. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Albuquerque, NM.

Stoleson, S.H., and D.M. Finch. 1999. Reproductive success of Southwestern Willow Flycatchers in the Cliff-Gila Valley. Summary report on the 1998 field season. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Albuquerque, NM.

Stoleson, S.H., D.M. Finch, and H.A. Walker. 1998. Surveys for Southwestern Willow Flycatchers in the Mimbres and Gila River Valleys. Report to The Nature Conservancy of New Mexico. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Albuquerque, NM.

Stoleson, S.H., and D.M. Finch. 1998. Reproductive success of Southwestern Willow Flycatchers in the Cliff-Gila Valley. Summary report on the 1997 field season. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Albuquerque, NM